Related Pages listed by

Informal Economy & WIEGO
Occupational Group(s): Street Vendors

HomeNet Thailand

HomeNet Thailand was founded in 1999 as an NGO to support home-based workers across Thailand. Today, HomeNet Thailand consists of:

Informal Economy Monitoring Study (IEMS)

IEMSThe 10-city Informal Economy Monitoring Study (IEMS) evaluates the realities that informal workers face. Qualitative and quantitative research methods together have provided an in-depth understanding of how home-based workers, street vendors, and waste pickers are affected by economic trends, urban policies and practices, value chain dynamics, and other economic and social forces.

StreetNet International

StreetNet International

Administrative Justice Project

All over the world, people who rely on access to public space and public resources face a litany of challenges to earn their livelihoods. The challenges largely result from decisions made by local government authorities who control public space and access to waste and land.

Key Debates about Street Vending

Lima peru street vendors

Street vending generates debates around the world. The key debates are summarized here.

Durban Legal Victory

Introduction: 

John Makwicana, a vendor in Warwick Junction in Durban/eThekwini, South Africa, took the municipality to court, claiming the law that allowed the confiscation of his goods was unconstitutional. He won a legal victory for street traders in South Africa. John died on March 7, 2018, but his legacy will live on. This videos captures a last interview with him. The rest of the story is detailed below.

Story of a Legal Victory

Since 2008, WIEGO has worked closely with Asiye eTafuleni ("a seat at the table" in Zulu) in Durban/eThekwini, South Africa. Founded by two former city employees who had worked together with informal workers in the Warwick Junction precinct of the city, the NGO provides design, legal and other support to street vendors, market traders, barrow operators, waste pickers and garment producers in Warwick Junction.

Informal Hawkers and Vendors Association of Ghana (IHVAG)

Informal Hawkers and Vendors Association of Ghana (IHVAG)

The Informal Hawkers and Vendors Association of Ghana (IHVAG) was formed in 2003, and registered in 2005. It was formerly called StreetNet Ghana. Currently, there are over 6,000 members, who work in street and market trading; approximately two-thirds of the members are women. The organization has six branches in two cities, and is governed by an executive committee of five women and two men.

Urban Informal Workers & The Green Economy

The urban poor – the majority of whom work informally – are at significant risk from the increased intensity and frequency of storms, flooding, landslides, heat waves and constraints on fresh water associated with climate change.2 And as a changing climate drives more of the rural poor into cities, the urban working poor face increasing competition.

Zimbabwe Chamber of Informal Economy Associations (ZCIEA)

Zimbabwe Chamber of Informal Economy Associations (ZCIEA) members include street/market vendors, construction workers, wastepickers, and other informal economy workers. As of January 2014 there were 10,500 members  in 150 Associations grouped into chapters.

Urban Renewal, Heritage Sites & Urban Livelihoods: Devi-Ben, Street Vendor

Urban Renewal, Heritage Sites & Urban Livelihoods: Devi-Ben, Street Vendor

These are the reflections of Marty Chen, WIEGO’s International Coordinator, following an Exposure-Dialogue Programme held January 27-February 1, 2013 in Ahmedabad, India, as part of WIEGO’s Law & Informality project. During the Exposure, Marty and Michael Piore of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology were guests of Devi-ben.