Related Pages listed by

WIEGO

WIEGO Individual Members

Individual Members of WIEGO are drawn from two constituencies:

How We Are Structured

Membership

Our membership (see Who We Are) is central in our governance and accountability structure. Members are entitled to review and comment on WIEGO’s progress reports and financial reports, to attend General Assemblies held every four years, and to elect representatives to a Nominating Committee that prepares the slate of candidates for the Board of Directors, which is elected at each General Assembly.

Integration as Defined by Waste Pickers in Johannesburg

Integration as Defined by Waste Pickers in Johannesburg

Recognition – when there is no privatization of waste, we are recognized as workers and our work is recognized as a public service.

Child Care and Informal Workers

WIEGO's Child Care Initiative

Child care is vital. Families, especially in the poorest households, rely on the earnings of informal women workers. A lack of quality child care contributes to gender inequalities in labour force participation rates and earnings and exacerbates high levels of poverty among women informal workers.

Johannesburg’s New Waste Programme Threatens Reclaimers’ Work

Johannesburg’s New Waste Programme Threatens Reclaimers’ Work

Statistics: Past Activities

Statistics

WIEGO has had and continues to play an important role in the development of statistics on all aspects of the informal economy.

The WIEGO Network's Impact

The WIEGO Network, a global action-research-policy network, consists of membership-based organizations (MBOs) of informal workers, researchers and statisticians, and professionals from development agencies (governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental). We seek to increase the voice, visibility, and validity of the working poor, especially women, in the informal economy.

Informal Hawkers and Vendors Association of Ghana (IHVAG)

Informal Hawkers and Vendors Association of Ghana (IHVAG)

The Informal Hawkers and Vendors Association of Ghana (IHVAG) was formed in 2003, and registered in 2005. It was formerly called StreetNet Ghana. Currently, there are over 6,000 members, who work in street and market trading; approximately two-thirds of the members are women. The organization has six branches in two cities, and is governed by an executive committee of five women and two men.