Related Pages listed by

Informal Economy Topic(s): Policies & Programmes in the Informal Economy

WIEGO Briefs

WIEGO Briefs are part of our Publication Series.

Public Space for All

Public space is a public good - for all city residents to access and enjoy, whether it is for leisure, transportation or earning a livelihood. However, competing uses of public space cause conflict, and often it is the most vulnerable users, informal workers, who are excluded. WIEGO believes struggles over public space should not be a zero sum game - rather, regulated public spaces offer possibilities for diverse uses to co-exist, ultimately making cities more vibrant and inclusive.

Child Care and Informal Workers

WIEGO's Child Care Initiative

Child care is vital. Families, especially in the poorest households, rely on the earnings of informal women workers. A lack of quality child care contributes to gender inequalities in labour force participation rates and earnings and exacerbates high levels of poverty among women informal workers.

Waste Picker Video Series: Chronicle of a Fight for Inclusion

Waste Picker Video Series: Chronicle of a Fight for Inclusion

About the Series

(Text in Spanish follows the English version)

Durban/eThekwini, South Africa Informal Economy Policy

In the 1990s, the city of Durban/eThekwini in South Africa established a department dedicated to street trader management and support and allocated resources to infrastructure development for traders.

Social & Legal Protection for the Informal Workforce

In development policy circles, two types of state protection for the informal workforce – especially the working poor – are actively under consideration: social protection and legal rights.

Labour Law and Informal Workers: The WIEGO Perspective

Historically, around the world, the “employment relationship” has represented the cornerstone – the central legal concept – around which labour law and collective bargaining agreements have sought to recognize and protect the rights of workers.

Policies & Programmes for Household Enterprises in Africa

In 2008, the World Bank Africa Region launched a three-year cross-country study on Improving the Productivity and Reducing Risk of Household Enterprises. One objective of this study was to highlight the scale and persistence of self-employment and economic activities based in the household rather than “firms,” even in economies with strong growth both overall and in wage employment (which remains too small to absorb a substantial share of new entrants in most developing countries).